Country, Culture, People, Future

Badimia

Badimia native title trial wraps up in Federal Court

Posted: April 5th, 2013

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This Wednesday 3 April was the last day of trial for the Badimia people’s native title case in the Federal Court.

It was the culmination of years of hard work and the end of a very long and difficult process for the Badimia people. YMAC would like to acknowledge the hard work and dedication of the Traditional Owners who contributed to and participated in this trial, which ranged over many months and several locations out on country and in Perth.

YMAC also acknowledges the elders who have passed away since the Badimia claim was lodged in 1998.

The Federal Court will now consider all of the evidence and submissions before making a decision on the Badimia people’s native title claim. A judgement is not expected before late 2013 or 2014.

Download YMAC News issue 20

Posted: February 20th, 2013

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The latest issue of YMAC News is now available for download.

It is full of stories about some of the accomplishments in our regions over the last few months. Agreements have been made between the Ngarlawangga people and Montezuma Mining Company Ltd, and the Kurama and Marthudunera people and Iron Ore Holdings Ltd, that are both notable for different reasons.

You can read about the Geraldton native title groups coming together to work towards an Alternative Settlement, and a meeting between Pilbara indigenous women and African women in mining.

We have several new members of our Yamatji Regional Committee and the Board of Directors, and we profile one of them, Beverley Ladyman.

The Badimia people won a battle in the National Native Title Tribunal to help protect one of their most sacred sites, and the Nyiyaparli people have discovered a site that was occupied 41,000 year ago while out on a heritage survey for a mining company.

We also answer one of our most frequently asked question, ‘Why does native title take so long?’

Click here to dowload YMAC News issue 20.

If you have any stories or photos you’d like to share with us, elders who you think we should profile, questions about native title, or any other letters to the editor, send them to editor@ymac.org.au.

We hope you enjoy this issue of YMAC News.

Badimaya Book Launch

Posted: November 21st, 2012

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This will be a great event in Mount Magnet by the Bundiyarra Irra Wangga Language Program celebrating the books of Joe Benjamin, Badimia culture and language.

Protection for Lake Moore in Midwest WA

Posted: November 9th, 2012

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The Badimia people’s ability to protect one of their most sacred places has recently been given a boost when the WA State Government dropped an appeal of a decision by the National Native Title Tribunal (NNTT). Lake Moore, a dry salt lake in the southern Murchison region of WA, has been found to be culturally significant by the NNTT on several occasions.

The NNTT has repeatedly found that as a site of particular significance, resource exploration licences that overlap the lake cannot be granted without negotiating with the Badimia people first. The State appealed the NNTT’s latest decision on the significance of Lake Moore, but recently discontinued the appeal.

Lake Moore Gypsum, the company seeking an exploration licence, now needs to negotiate with the Badimia people to reach an agreement about the exploration activities.

Lake Moore, located south of Paynes Find, is a very special area where Badimia families go every year to hunt, camp, collect bush medicines, and teach young people about their country and culture. Lake Moore and the surrounding area is not only important as a place for Badimia families to go out on country, but it is home to very sacred places where ceremonies traditionally took place.

Language programs in Geraldton

Posted: September 10th, 2012

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The Bundiyarra Irra Wangga Language program offers a variety of Indigenous language classes and workshops. These include:
    • Language Awareness Community Workshops on the languages of the Murchison-Gascoyne Regions (including Badimaya, Malgana, Nhanda, Wajarri and Yinggarda).
    • Community Wajarri Language Classes (held on Saturday mornings at the Bundiyarra complex)

       

 

  • The Master and Apprentice Language Teaching Model; where younger people (apprentices) learn to speak language with support from older speakers (masters)

     

 

 

  • Community Language Nests focusing on the immersion of children between 0 – 5 in their local language

 

 

Bundiyarra Irra Wangga also has a range of educational material available, including books, posters, flashcards and the recently completed Wajarri Dictionary.
Irra Wangga strives to preserve, maintain and promote the languages of the Murchison-Gascoyne regions of Western Australia, which are becoming increasingly threatened and endangered.
The language program is currently looking for sponsors to help with the delivery of language related activities that assist the whole community to grow in understanding, pride and the learning of Aboriginal languages.
If you are interested in sponsoring any of the language program’s activities or events, please contact Jennifer Kniveton, Language Program Coordinator, on (08) 9920 7900.
For more information on any of these programs, or to purchase educational materials, please contact Irra Wangga directly on (08) 9920 7950.

 

YMAC is a proud supporter of the Bundiyarra Irra Wangga language program

Djuba Dreaming: Badimia story on ABC

Posted: July 6th, 2012

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The stories of three Badimia people are now up on the website for ABC local (Mid West and Wheatbelt). Janice Slater has contributed a very personal written story of memories of childhood on Badimia country. This is accompanied by a video featuring Beverley Slater and Donald Clinch reflecting on their ties to country, and showing beautiful footage of the land they love.

Click here to view both pieces

Download YMAC News issue 17

Posted: March 22nd, 2012

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The latest issue of YMAC News is now available from our website.

It features a ceremony marking a milestone on Badimia country, a unique agreement for the future of the Njamal people, an important legal win for the Kurama and Marthudunera people, and a valuable course attended by YMAC’s co-Chairs.

There are also several new features, including “Respect for elders”, a section profiling respected elders of the Midwest and Pilbara. This issue looks at Ngarla men Charlie Coppin and Stephen Stewart. There is also a new “Frequently asked questions” section and a new column from Christina Colegate, YMAC’s policy officer.

We have also profiled YMAC Committee member Rodney Ryan, staff member Jerry Maher, and community member Dawn Hamlett.

If you have any stories you’d like to share with us, elders who you think we should profile, questions about native title, or any other letters to the editor, send them to editor@ymac.org.au.

We hope you enjoy this issue of YMAC news.

Click here to download your copy.

Badimia protects Lake Moore

Posted: June 23rd, 2011

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Yesterday the National Native Title Tribunal handed down a decision that will help the Badimia people look after Lake Moore and the many places around it that are important to the Badimia people.

Lake Moore, a dry salt lake south of Paynes Find, is a very special place for Badimia people. Many Badimia people visit the area with their families every year to go camping, hunting, collecting bush medicines and teaching the younger generations about country and culture. Lake Moore and the surrounding area is not only important as a place for Badimia families to go out on country, but it is home to very sacred places where ceremonies traditionally took place.

The National Native Title Tribunal recognised how important this place is for the Badimia people by ruling that the company seeking a mineral exploration licence has to negotiate with the Badimia people before it can have access to the area for low-impact exploration activities. This will allow the Badimia people to have more of a say over access to the area, and will give them a chance to make sure the mineral explorers have an understanding of the significance of the area.